Through a broad consultative process, CSOs have set up the Civil Society Engagement Mechanism (CSEM) of UHC2030 to represent their constituency. Membership in the CSEM is open to all civil society representatives advancing health, financing and governance agendas that relate to achieving UHC. Identifying as a UHC advocate is not a requirement for joining.

Why a CSO Engagement 
mechanism in UHC2030?

The CSEM wants to strengthen a broad and inclusive UHC movement, which can influence policy design and implementation and facilitate citizen-led accountability. The aim is to build strong CSO voices and contribute significantly to UHC2030, ensuring systematic attention is paid to the needs of the most marginalised and vulnerable populations so that ‘no one is left behind’. Membership in the CSEM is open to all civil society representatives advancing health, financing and governance agendas that relate to achieving UHC. 

Advocacy Messages

1. Leave no one behind

Civil society is often best placed to gain access to, represent, and prioritize the most marginalized key populations. To leave no one behind, civil society is a critical voice to ensure that: people have the necessary access to equitable health services; they are informed of health policies; can input into their country’s health systems strengthening efforts.

2. Increase Public Financing for Health

To ensure universal health coverage and health system strengthening, reducing out of pocket expenses and achieving the aims of the SDGs, national governments and donors should take certain actions.

  • National governments should progressively increase their investment in health by either moving towards allocating at least 15% of their annual budget to health, or up to 5% of their annual GDP as government health care expenditure, as contextually appropriate.  This increased budget for health should be raised through mandatory and fair pooling mechanisms (such as improving tax revenue collection, setting up social health insurance) with everyone receiving services according to their need.  These services should be free at the point of use.
  • National governments should give priority to primary health care linked to essential care packages that are defined by country-level needs and priorities required to meet SDG target 3.8.1, with a concrete plan to ensure the removal of direct cash payments as an urgent measure.
  • Donor governments should provide funding in alignment with countries’ plans, the aid effectiveness principles and the WHO recommendation of funding levels not below 0.1% of GNI.  This is critical in fragile and conflict-affected settings, where much of the health system is supported by foreign aid.  Donors should further support low-income countries to bridge significant finance gaps.  The international community should support countries to grow their fiscal space by tackling undermining practices like tax evasion and avoidance, and lifting harmful macro-economic policy conditions.

3. Improve Involvement of CSOs and Citizens, Transparency and Accountability at All Levels

Civil society must be included in decision-making processes at all levels, to facilitate citizen-led monitoring of progress against outcomes towards universal health coverage, including the health budget and adherence to commitments. This includes involvement in health systems strengthening efforts at national and district level, and the provision of expanded health coverage to the poorest and most marginalized groups.  Strengthening social-led accountability is necessary to maintain the integrity of health systems, prevent corruption-related resource drain, and ensure more appropriate, acceptable and sustainable health programs.

4. Invest in Health Workers

Achieving universal health coverage depends on the availability, accessibility, and capacity of professionally trained health workers, more so at the primary care level, to deliver quality, people-centered health services.  It is critical to ensure that adequate health care financing is earmarked for training and capacity building of community and frontline health workers so that they are able to support the provision of inclusive, holistic and equitable health services, especially to those who are most marginalized.

Advocacy Collaboratives

The CSEM led and contributed to convening advocacy collaboratives for UHC to bring together multi-stakeholder representatives who support global and country level UHC advocacy. Joint action amplifies the call to drive progress on, and the multi-stakeholder composition opens up opportunities for communication, knowledge sharing and collaboration. View the intiatives on the CSEM website.

Recent resources 

Read 12 civil society stories on UHC produced for UHC Day (2018)

Civil society statement: global conference on primary health care (2018)

Statement: meeting of Civil Society representatives & CSO secretariats of global health initiatives (2018)

Letter to Dr Tedros: Civil Society and the Global Action Plan for Healthy Living and Well-being for All (2018)

On the Road to UHC: Leave No One Behind - A civil society organisation (CSO) perspective on how UHC can be reached by 2030


More information

CSO statement on UHC Forum 2017

CSO social media toolkit for World Health Day on UHC

UHC2030 Advocacy Guide

You can read more about the process of developing the CSEM here: 

Assessment of civil society engagement mechanisms in global initiatives 

Survey report for CSO engagement mechanisms in UHC2030

Proposal for a civil society engagement mechanism 

UHC2030 and the civil society engagement mechanism also available in French and Spanish.

Review of the Health Policy Action Fund

Civil Society Engagement News

04/07/2019
08/04/2019

The UHC2030 CSEM shares its activities and events to promote and...

01/02/2019

Read about the UHC2030's Civil Society Engagement Mechanism's...

"To make real, consistent and sustainable progress towards UHC, the global community needs to consider stronger investments in civil society and communities’ work on policy change, resource mobilisation and accountability." 

Rosemary Mburu, Waci Health

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